Wellington an Viscount Castlereagh vom 12. März 1815



To Viscount Castlereagh, K.G.

Vienna, 12th March, 1815

I received here on the 7th instant a dispatch from Lord Burghersch, of the 1st, giving an account that Buonaparte had quitted the island of Elba, with all his civil and military officers, and about 1200 troops, in the 26th February. I immediately communicated this account to the Emperors of Austria and Russia, and to the King of Prussia, and to the Ministers of the different Powers, and I found amon all one prevailing sentiment, of a determination to unite their efforts to support the systems established by the peace at Paris.

As it was uncertain to what quarter Buonaparte had gone, whether he would nut return to Elba, or would even land on any part of the Continent, it was agreed that it was best to postpone the adoption of any measure till his farther progress should be ascertained; and we have since received accounts from Genoa, stating that he had landed in France, near Cannes, on the 1st March; had attempted to get possession of Antibes, and had been repulsed, and that he was on his march towards Grasse.

No accounts had been received at Paris as late as the middle of the day of the 5th of his having quitted Elba, nor any accounts from any quarter of his farther progress.

In the mean time the Sovereigns, and all persons assembled here, are impresses with the importance of the crisis which this circumstance occasions in the affairs of the world. All are desirous of bringing to an early conclusion the business of the Congress, in order that the whole and undivided attention and exertion of all may be directed against the common enemy; and I do not exertion of all may be directed against the common enemy; and I do not entertain the smallest doubt that, even if Buonaparte should be able to form a party for himself in France, capable of making head against the legitimate Government of that country, such a force will be assembled by the Powers of Europe directed by such a spirit in their councils, as must get the better of him.

The Emperors of Austria and Russia and the King of Prussia have dispatched letters to the King of France, to place at His Majesty’s disposal all their respective countries placed on the French frontiers, at the suggestion of the King of France.

The Plenipotentiaries of the 8 Powers who signed the Treaty of Paris assembled this evening, and have resolved to publish a declaration, in which they will, in the name of their Sovereigns, declare their firm resolution to maintain the peace and all its articles with all their forces, if necessary. I enclose the draught of what is proposed to be published, which, with the alteration of some expressions and the omission of one or two paragraphs, will, I believe, be adopted.

Upon the whole, I assure your Lordship that I am perfectly satisfied with the spirit which prevails here upon this occasion; and I do not entertain the smallest doubt that, if unfortunately it should be possible for Buonaparte to hold at all against the King of France, he must fall under the cordially united efforts of the Sovereigns of Europe.